History

We aim to stimulate a life-long interest in history by helping students to understand the present in the context of the past.  History illuminates student understanding of the present by providing a context for contemporary events.

YEAR 9

Year 9 Students study British, European and world history from 1700 to the end of the 19th century. Topics covered include: Britain at the start of the 18th century; Life in Gin Age London; Smuggling; the Slave Trade; a comparison between village and town life; Crime and Punishment in 18th century Britain and an in depth study of the career of a famous criminal; the French Revolution; the growth of the British Empire; an investigation of what it was like to fight and work in Nelson’s Navy and participate in the Battle of Trafalgar; Life as a British Soldier and the Battle of Waterloo; the Zulu wars; a local study: the Jacobites and the Battle of Culloden. As part of this topic students re-enact part of Bonnie Prince Charlie‘s invasion of 1745 and visit Culloden battlefield with an 18th century guide!

They also tour Fort George and witness the medical treatment given to injured and dying soldiers.

Emphasis in the teaching is placed upon the development of the historical skills required for GCSE History courses and on stimulating an interest in the subject. History is taught using a varied range of techniques including a regular use of video, multimedia titles and presentation graphics.

GCSE (OCR)

The Modern World History course begins In Year 10 with a detailed study of the compulsory British History Depth Study. Students will investigate how British society changed between 1890 and 1918. This will involve a study of the working and living conditions of the poor in the 1890s and aims to show students how workers’ lives had changed by 1918; and an investigation of the social, political and legal position of women in the same period. The Depth Study ends with a look at how civilians were affected by World War One. Topics examined include trench warfare; the use of gas and tanks; the war in the air; shell shock, injuries, mutinies, conscientious objectors; the war poets and the use of the white feather and the effectiveness of British propaganda on the British people.

Students continue the course with an investigation of Aspects of International Relations 1919-1939. They will begin by studying the Versailles Peace Treaty and end with a study of the causes of World War II including an investigation of Hitler’s foreign policy and Japanese aggression in the Far East.

The second half of the course is the Modern World Study: Germany 1918-1945. This involves looking at Hitler’s rise to power; life in the Third Reich for women, farmers, the middle class and young people; the Hitler Youth and the Swing Kids; the SA, the Night of the Long Knives and the SS and the creation of the police state; Jewish policy; education and propaganda; economic policy and opposition and the 1944 bomb plot to assassinate Hitler.

Finally students tackle a Controlled Assessment task based on a taught course from one of the following: the role of the individual in history; a thematic study in twentieth century history; a modern world study or a study in depth. It should be possible for candidates to satisfy the requirements of the board by writing no more than 2000 words for the task.

AS/A2 LEVEL (OCR)

The aim of the course is to prepare students for an A-Level in History. It can be combined with the study of any Arts or Science subjects. The specification is designed to develop students’ interest in historical events, their critical and writing skills and a wide knowledge of nineteenth and twentieth century issues.

Students will study a range of topics chosen from English history 1789-1918 and European and World History 1789-1939.  These include the following: the Third Reich 1933-45; British foreign and imperial policies 1846-1902; International Relations 1919-1942; the relationship between Britain and Germany between 1933-39 and the nature of warfare between 1789-1918.

History A-Level is a valuable qualifying subject for a range of university courses such as history, law, journalism, PPE, politics, business studies, archaeology and classics. Students are usually expected to have achieved at least Grade B at GCSE Level.


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